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Teachers as Learners: 6 Great Professional Development Ideas

Just like the differentiated lessons taught to meet students’ individual needs, teachers must learn strategies in PD arranged for their individual needs.

If you’re interested in developing your knowledge and skill as a peace practitioner in your classroom, these six ideas for PD will help you get there. A key is that they require engaging collaboratively in dialogue with colleagues in intentional reflection on what’s happening in the classroom.

All of the 6 ideas draw on the principles of reflective practice for making change, which has been shown to be one of the most effective forms of adult learning. This means that the reflective cycle is also a necessary part of peace education and peacebuilding in general.

I’ve done all of these at one time or another in my teaching career, and I’ve found the interactive and intentional nature of the approaches extremely helpful. Although they take a bit of work to set up, particularly if you’re on your own at this point, they have the potential to be much more valuable than just another workshop.

What kind of PD opportunities can you set up in your context? If you’re interested in setting something up in your area or through this website, leave a comment or send a message via our contact page!

Source: Teachers as Learners: 6 Great Professional Development Ideas | Edudemic

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About clwoelk

Cheryl Woelk is coordinator of Language for Peace and specializes in language and peace education in multicultural contexts. She holds an MA in Education and a graduate certificate in Peacebuilding from Eastern Mennonite University in Virginia, USA. Cheryl currently lives in Saskatchewan, Canada with her spouse and son.

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Contributing Author

Cheryl Woelk is coordinator of Language for Peace and specializes in language and peace education in multicultural contexts. She holds an MA in Education and a graduate certificate in Peacebuilding from Eastern Mennonite University in Virginia, USA. Cheryl currently lives in Saskatchewan, Canada with her spouse and son.

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