In the News

Leadership Skills and Language Skills

Language skills are essential tools for leadership according to Rawn Shah from Forbes in his article Leadership Skills Multiply With Language Skills. Focusing on how language learning helps to understand culture and worldview differences, essential for business success, Shah suggests that learning language is one of the tools that leaders often overlook. As peacebuilding in organization requires an understanding of culture, environment, structures and strong leadership, this article has something to say for peace practitioners as well.

Advertisements

About clwoelk

Cheryl Woelk is coordinator of Language for Peace and specializes in language and peace education in multicultural contexts. She holds an MA in Education and a graduate certificate in Peacebuilding from Eastern Mennonite University in Virginia, USA. Cheryl currently lives in Saskatchewan, Canada with her spouse and son.

Discussion

5 thoughts on “Leadership Skills and Language Skills

  1. Portugal 1?? That can’t possibly be right… English is spoken very widely in Portugal, and many even speak a third or a forth language…!

    Like

    Posted by ladyofthecakes | July 27, 2015, 3:50 pm
    • You may be right. These numbers are based on average number of languages from the Eurobarometer 386 survey organized by the European Commission (see the link to the article and click below the map for more details) I’d be interested to know if you find other data on it. The languages we “speak” can always be a bit ambiguous since there’s no common definition and surveys can be interpreted in many different ways.

      Like

      Posted by clwoelk | July 27, 2015, 8:37 pm
      • Yes, I did look at the article… still, am puzzled 😉 In the case of Spain, 1.5 makes sense, despite the prevailing poor standard of English, because many Spaniards are indeed bilingual, owing to the regional languages of Euskara, Catalan and Galician. Putting Germany at 2.0, on the other hand, seems overly optimistic to me. A large number of Germans who are not university educated are effectively monolingual.

        Like

        Posted by ladyofthecakes | July 28, 2015, 12:41 am
      • Interesting! What do you think might make for the difference in data?

        Like

        Posted by clwoelk | July 30, 2015, 6:58 am
      • No idea…! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        Posted by ladyofthecakes | July 30, 2015, 9:10 am

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Contributing Author

Cheryl Woelk is coordinator of Language for Peace and specializes in language and peace education in multicultural contexts. She holds an MA in Education and a graduate certificate in Peacebuilding from Eastern Mennonite University in Virginia, USA. Cheryl currently lives in Saskatchewan, Canada with her spouse and son.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

%d bloggers like this: