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How to Pretend to be Fluent in Norwegian

Even if it’s not Norwegian you’re learning, many language learners could relate to this writer’s experience of “faking it till you make it,” which is actually a very effective language acquisition strategy! This includes useful tips such as repeating certain listening phrases to keep the conversation going and chatting with elderly people in your community who have lots of time and stories to share. Perhaps this is a good example too of how language learning is truly a relational journey, best experienced in the context of community.

A Frog in the Fjord

© Alice Baguet Illustration by www.alicebaguet.com © Alice Baguet
Illustration by http://www.alicebaguet.com

Becoming fluent in Norwegian is a long and bumpy path, full of “YEAAAHHHH I am so good at this” and “Oh my God I will never make it” moments. In the down moments, when you burst out laughing thinking THAT was a joke (sorry it wasn’t, say the eyes of your mystified colleagues), you will need some little things to keep you going. Small expressions or words that will automatically make you feel more fluent than you really are. Who doesn’t like to hear “Du er SÅ flink i norsk!” (you are so good in Norwegian!) when you perfectly know you aren’t?

This blogpost is inspired by a short article in The Oslo Eye. I made my own list of things that make me feel like I am more fluent in Norwegian. Hopefully it will be of some help for other immigrants like…

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About clwoelk

Cheryl Woelk is coordinator of Language for Peace and specializes in language and peace education in multicultural contexts. She holds an MA in Education and a graduate certificate in Peacebuilding from Eastern Mennonite University in Virginia, USA. Cheryl currently lives in Saskatchewan, Canada with her spouse and son.

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Contributing Author

Cheryl Woelk is coordinator of Language for Peace and specializes in language and peace education in multicultural contexts. She holds an MA in Education and a graduate certificate in Peacebuilding from Eastern Mennonite University in Virginia, USA. Cheryl currently lives in Saskatchewan, Canada with her spouse and son.

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